Article

VISUAL MERCHANDISING + STORE DESIGN

Luxe…With Vision

A visual tour of one covet-worthy luxury location reveals 7 elevated merchandising approaches befitting of high-end eyewear

Valerie Vittu, owner of Margot & Camille

Valerie Vittu, owner of Margot & Camille in Philadelphia, is passionate about her business. Her carefully curated collection of high-end and luxury eyewear is expertly edited and always shown in its best light. Literally.

Here, she offers an intimate look at—and a visual tour of—seven keys to how she visually merchandises her eyewear to create an ambience that is at once welcoming, lighthearted, and elegant.

—Stephanie K. De Long

#1 SURPRISE

Playing with light and adding elements of surprise that can be viewed inside and out is important.

#2 POSITIONING

Our displays are mostly wall-mounted shelves, installed in sets of three. We show only three frames per shelf.

#3 GLASS

We also have some freestanding displays (usually glass cabinets). This is where we put the most expensive pieces, and it’s not far from where we make transactions, so that allows us to keep an eye on them. I always try to give them a theme, too.

#4 PLACEMENT

All the frames, other than those on built-in shelving along the walls, are displayed on glass shelves. Whether freestanding or enclosed, on tabletops or shelves, glass enhances our open feel and offers easy access.

#5 PRESENTATION

We always select a small number of frames to present at one time (10 or less…usually less). And, we usually present the selection in trays. It shows that we’ve curated the selection just for the customer, and it helps with security, too.

#6 BRANDS

We usually display by brand. It gives a better sense of design and provides continuous flow. Sometimes, however, we display by color and mix the brands. It all depends on what statement you are making.

#7 HARMONY

We position eyewear as art to be worn. Everything is usually in harmony with our store image and with the concept of fine eyewear. I always want the entire store to show as a design place, not a doctor’s office.